walkingthenarrowway:

sapphrikah:

butwilltherebetea:


Rock Newman on The Phil Donahue Show sharing his experiences as a black man who has passed as white. 

Literally just said this the other day

Tell them again, because they act real hard of hearing when we explain this shit.

but they don’t hear u doeee.
walkingthenarrowway:

sapphrikah:

butwilltherebetea:


Rock Newman on The Phil Donahue Show sharing his experiences as a black man who has passed as white. 

Literally just said this the other day

Tell them again, because they act real hard of hearing when we explain this shit.

but they don’t hear u doeee.
walkingthenarrowway:

sapphrikah:

butwilltherebetea:


Rock Newman on The Phil Donahue Show sharing his experiences as a black man who has passed as white. 

Literally just said this the other day

Tell them again, because they act real hard of hearing when we explain this shit.

but they don’t hear u doeee.

walkingthenarrowway:

sapphrikah:

butwilltherebetea:

Rock Newman on The Phil Donahue Show sharing his experiences as a black man who has passed as white. 

Literally just said this the other day

Tell them again, because they act real hard of hearing when we explain this shit.

but they don’t hear u doeee.

(via msenjoli)

Why hello passionfornailarts. I see you’ve followed me. Welcome! I hope you enjoy all the nails and arts on my blog. Come for the nails! Stay for the passion! 

IT’S JACKET WEATHER

I freaking love jacket weather.

When I first became an actor, I wanted to play lots of roles - Guidos, gangsters and goombahs were my specialty. So, would I be able to play all of those parts after portraying a sensitive, moisturizing, Ashton Kutcher-loving, pink-shirt-wearing kid? I was optimistic. Hollywood? Not so much. I was meeting a “gay glass ceiling” in casting…

One time I wanted to audition for a supporting character in a low-budget indie movie described as a “doughy, blue-collar lug of a guy.” …I figured I was perfect for it.

They said they were looking for a real “man’s man.” The casting director wouldn’t even let me audition. This wasn’t the last time this happened. There were industry people who had seen me play you in Mean Girls but never seen me read in an audition but still denied me to be seen for “masculine” roles.

Actor Daniel Franzese Writes a Touching Coming Out Letter To His Iconic ‘Mean Girls’ Character Damian. Franzese writes about how playing the role of Damian in the movie meant facing discrimination and typecasting in Hollywood.

However, I did turn down many offers to play flamboyant, feather-boa-slinging stereotypes that always seemed to be laughed at BECAUSE they were gay. How could I go from playing an inspirational, progressive gay youth to the embarrassing, cliched butt-of-a-joke?

It wasn’t until years later that grown men started to coming up to me on the street - some of them in tears - and thanking me for being a role model to them. Telling me I gave them comfort not only being young and gay but also being a big dude. It was then that I realized how much of an impact YOU had made on them.

(via geekbap)

(via geekbap)

I started watching Bob’s Burgers today. It is funny. 

chescaleigh:

This Is The War On Drugs (via “The House I Live In”)

A call to national conscience, the activist documentary “The House I Live In” is persuasively urgent. Directed with heart by Eugene Jarecki, the movie is an insistently personal and political look at the war on drugs and its thousands of casualties, including those serving hard time for minor offenses. It is, Mr. Jarecki asserts — as he sifts through the data, weighs the evidence and checks in with those on both sides of the law — a war that has led to mass incarcerations characterized by profound racial disparities and that has created another front in the civil rights movement. (via NY Times)

Here’s the thing, going into this film I KNEW our criminal justice system was messed up, but I didn’t expect to see politicians, judges and corrections officers chiming in and demanding that the system change. THAT was incredibly eye opening for me and all the more reason that more people need to see this film. If you haven’t seen it already, this amazing documentary is currently available for rent and instant streaming on Netflix. And if you don’t have Netflix, you’re in luck because April is officially the last month I’m able to offer my followers a free month subscription through netflix.com/chescaleigh
chescaleigh:

This Is The War On Drugs (via “The House I Live In”)

A call to national conscience, the activist documentary “The House I Live In” is persuasively urgent. Directed with heart by Eugene Jarecki, the movie is an insistently personal and political look at the war on drugs and its thousands of casualties, including those serving hard time for minor offenses. It is, Mr. Jarecki asserts — as he sifts through the data, weighs the evidence and checks in with those on both sides of the law — a war that has led to mass incarcerations characterized by profound racial disparities and that has created another front in the civil rights movement. (via NY Times)

Here’s the thing, going into this film I KNEW our criminal justice system was messed up, but I didn’t expect to see politicians, judges and corrections officers chiming in and demanding that the system change. THAT was incredibly eye opening for me and all the more reason that more people need to see this film. If you haven’t seen it already, this amazing documentary is currently available for rent and instant streaming on Netflix. And if you don’t have Netflix, you’re in luck because April is officially the last month I’m able to offer my followers a free month subscription through netflix.com/chescaleigh

chescaleigh:

This Is The War On Drugs (via “The House I Live In”)

A call to national conscience, the activist documentary “The House I Live In” is persuasively urgent. Directed with heart by Eugene Jarecki, the movie is an insistently personal and political look at the war on drugs and its thousands of casualties, including those serving hard time for minor offenses. It is, Mr. Jarecki asserts — as he sifts through the data, weighs the evidence and checks in with those on both sides of the law — a war that has led to mass incarcerations characterized by profound racial disparities and that has created another front in the civil rights movement. (via NY Times)

Here’s the thing, going into this film I KNEW our criminal justice system was messed up, but I didn’t expect to see politicians, judges and corrections officers chiming in and demanding that the system change. THAT was incredibly eye opening for me and all the more reason that more people need to see this film. If you haven’t seen it already, this amazing documentary is currently available for rent and instant streaming on Netflix. And if you don’t have Netflix, you’re in luck because April is officially the last month I’m able to offer my followers a free month subscription through netflix.com/chescaleigh

(via geekbap)

drunkinlike:

sourcedumal:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

Hats off to both. I look forward to seeing what happens

And watch how the media won’t give them any praise whatsoever despite them trying to create jobs for people

part of the problem is they are only helping black kids, and people only get attention for helping black kids if they are white.

Fantastic. They’re not going to get the credit they deserve, but they’re going to change a hell of a lot of lives anyway. Heroes.

(via geekbap)

ehbeesea3:

For everyone whose argument against a living wage or mandatory leave or employer-managed health insurance or whatever is “but then prices would go up!”

Astounding.

I know I’m never going to do this because I’m terrible at DIY anything, but what a great idea!

swan2swan:

"You’e weak! And I’ve outgrown you."
My brother called me yesterday with a stunning revelation he’d had about this scene: intentional or not, this is a perfect commentary on the superhero genre of today, and about one of its greatest weaknesses.
He’s calling Mr. Incredible weak here because the man refused to do one thing—and that was to kill someone. And because he sees him as being unable to kill, he sees him as weak—and childish. “I’ve outgrown you.” Now he is in the realm of “mature” superheroes, where Superman has to snap a man’s neck and Catwoman has to shoot Bane, where the purity of a woman forged by clay is unrelatable and marriage is nonconducive to an interesting story. His is a world where superheroes die to make villains seem impressive, a world where a dark and gritty realism is more important than a fun and adventurous fantasy. 
In the end of this movie, though, the Omnidroid isn’t beaten by Mr. Incredible finding Syndrome and beating an explanation out of him to stop the robot; they solve it through brainwork, audacity, and a fun and creative action sequence. Syndrome dies in the end, yes, but that’s primarily because he keeps trying to push his view, and ends up destroying himself.
But this is Syndrome being Zack Snyder or Frank Miller, and believing that the fun adventures of yesteryear are childish fantasies that need to be left behind: ours is a world where to relate to a superhero, we have to see that superhero be unable to accomplish his task completely, where he has to settle and accept a compromise in order to preserve the greater good. We can’t admire them for being able to do what we cannot—we have to grow up and see that they’re just like us, they’re nothing special. Not really. And that is what true maturity is. A truly mature Avatar would kill the Firelord, a truly mature Superman would have no choice but to fight in the middle of a city, and video games need to be about cover-based shooting and military combat in the real world. With quick-time-events!
And of course, that’s all complete bullcrap, and the sooner that mentality gets sucked into a jet engine, the happier I’ll be. 

Beautifully put.
swan2swan:

"You’e weak! And I’ve outgrown you."
My brother called me yesterday with a stunning revelation he’d had about this scene: intentional or not, this is a perfect commentary on the superhero genre of today, and about one of its greatest weaknesses.
He’s calling Mr. Incredible weak here because the man refused to do one thing—and that was to kill someone. And because he sees him as being unable to kill, he sees him as weak—and childish. “I’ve outgrown you.” Now he is in the realm of “mature” superheroes, where Superman has to snap a man’s neck and Catwoman has to shoot Bane, where the purity of a woman forged by clay is unrelatable and marriage is nonconducive to an interesting story. His is a world where superheroes die to make villains seem impressive, a world where a dark and gritty realism is more important than a fun and adventurous fantasy. 
In the end of this movie, though, the Omnidroid isn’t beaten by Mr. Incredible finding Syndrome and beating an explanation out of him to stop the robot; they solve it through brainwork, audacity, and a fun and creative action sequence. Syndrome dies in the end, yes, but that’s primarily because he keeps trying to push his view, and ends up destroying himself.
But this is Syndrome being Zack Snyder or Frank Miller, and believing that the fun adventures of yesteryear are childish fantasies that need to be left behind: ours is a world where to relate to a superhero, we have to see that superhero be unable to accomplish his task completely, where he has to settle and accept a compromise in order to preserve the greater good. We can’t admire them for being able to do what we cannot—we have to grow up and see that they’re just like us, they’re nothing special. Not really. And that is what true maturity is. A truly mature Avatar would kill the Firelord, a truly mature Superman would have no choice but to fight in the middle of a city, and video games need to be about cover-based shooting and military combat in the real world. With quick-time-events!
And of course, that’s all complete bullcrap, and the sooner that mentality gets sucked into a jet engine, the happier I’ll be. 

Beautifully put.

swan2swan:

"You’e weak! And I’ve outgrown you."

My brother called me yesterday with a stunning revelation he’d had about this scene: intentional or not, this is a perfect commentary on the superhero genre of today, and about one of its greatest weaknesses.

He’s calling Mr. Incredible weak here because the man refused to do one thing—and that was to kill someone. And because he sees him as being unable to kill, he sees him as weak—and childish. “I’ve outgrown you.” Now he is in the realm of “mature” superheroes, where Superman has to snap a man’s neck and Catwoman has to shoot Bane, where the purity of a woman forged by clay is unrelatable and marriage is nonconducive to an interesting story. His is a world where superheroes die to make villains seem impressive, a world where a dark and gritty realism is more important than a fun and adventurous fantasy. 

In the end of this movie, though, the Omnidroid isn’t beaten by Mr. Incredible finding Syndrome and beating an explanation out of him to stop the robot; they solve it through brainwork, audacity, and a fun and creative action sequence. Syndrome dies in the end, yes, but that’s primarily because he keeps trying to push his view, and ends up destroying himself.

But this is Syndrome being Zack Snyder or Frank Miller, and believing that the fun adventures of yesteryear are childish fantasies that need to be left behind: ours is a world where to relate to a superhero, we have to see that superhero be unable to accomplish his task completely, where he has to settle and accept a compromise in order to preserve the greater good. We can’t admire them for being able to do what we cannot—we have to grow up and see that they’re just like us, they’re nothing special. Not really. And that is what true maturity is. A truly mature Avatar would kill the Firelord, a truly mature Superman would have no choice but to fight in the middle of a city, and video games need to be about cover-based shooting and military combat in the real world. With quick-time-events!

And of course, that’s all complete bullcrap, and the sooner that mentality gets sucked into a jet engine, the happier I’ll be. 

Beautifully put.

(via geekbap)